News

The CaGIS Board is calling for nominations to the Board to serve starting spring of 2023. 

There are 3 positions open: the Vice President, and two Director positions. Membership on the CaGIS board requires current membership in CaGIS while serving on the Board. The CaGIS bylaws state that the Vice President position for this next year be filled with a person in academia. However, if such a person cannot be recruited the position can be filled by a member from the government or in the private sector. The two director positions are open to anyone in academia, government or private sector. The two persons rotating off the board are from government, so we are especially looking for candidates from government or the private sector to maintain representation from all of CaGIS’s constituencies.

The responsibilities and expectations of these positions are as follows:

The Vice-President shall be elected by the Voting Members for a term of one (1) year. The Vice President shall preside at the meetings of the Society and of the Board in the absence of the President and President Elect, and discharge the duties of the President in the event of disability or in case of a vacancy in both that office and the office of President Elect. 

The Vice President shall automatically succeed to the position of President Elect for a term of one (1) year at the end of their term as Vice President, and then automatically succeed to the position of President for one (1) year at the end of their term as President Elect, and then automatically succeed to the position of Past President for one (1) year after their term as President.

Directors shall be elected for four (4) – year terms by Voting Members. The term of the Directors shall be staggered so that no more than three (3) Directors are elected in any one-year. No more than three (3) Directors may be employed by the Federal Government at the time of their election. A director may serve no more than two consecutive terms on the Board. The Directors shall aid in the management of the affairs of the Society, shall furnish counsel, and shall participate in all official actions of the Board.

Board Responsibilities:

The primary responsibility is conducting the activities of the Society. The Board has the authority to determine policies and procedures of the Society; providing such actions are in conformity with the provisions of the CaGIS By-Laws. The President, in consultation with the Executive Director, Treasurer, the President Elect, and the Vice President, shall prepare an annual budget including dues paid annually by the members to cover costs of Society programs and activities. The President shall submit the budget to the Board for approval.

Please contact Thomas Pingel (tpingel@vt.edu, Chair of the Nominations Committee) with nominations by replying to this email. Self nominations are welcome. Nominees must submit a brief bio, and a statement of their interest and what they could contribute to CaGIS and the Board.

The deadline for receiving this information is Nov 15.

John Dolloff and Hank Theiss will be presenting “Principles of Accuracy and Predicted Accuracy in Photogrammetric-based Geopositioning” at the next GeoBytes webinar on Friday, October 21 at 12:00 pm ET. The webinar is FREE for all CaGIS members. See attached abstract for more information about the presentation.

Please see the CaGIS GeoBytes page for more information on registering.

Abstract

This webinar addresses the importance and use of both accuracy and predicted accuracy in a Geolocation System. Accuracy is typically represented as a LE90, CE90, and/or SE90 corresponding to 90% probable vertical, horizontal, and 3d spherical radial error, respectively, of an arbitrary geolocation
or geolocation product generated by or using data from the Geolocation System. Order statistics are recommended for their computation based on a recommended minimum number of independent and identically distributed (iid) samples of error, or approximately iid samples of error if certain constraints are met. The underlying probability distribution of errors is neither required nor used. Based on these samples, a best estimate of LE90, CE90, and/or SE90 are computed, as well as corresponding least-upper-bounds computed at a 90% confidence level, in order to assess the accuracy of the Geolocation System and/or determine if corresponding specified requirements are met. Predicted accuracy is associated with an arbitrary but specific geolocation associated with the Geolocation System. It is a “current” geolocation, either already extracted using the Geolocation System’s data, typically via a Weighted Least Squares (WLS) Solution using multiple images, or contained in one of the Geolocation System’s products, such as a Digital Surface Model (DSM). The WLS provides both a best estimate of the geolocation as well as its specific error covariance matrix. Predicted Accuracy is based on predictive statistics, the key statistic is the error covariance matrix uniquely associated with each geolocation, and an assumed type of probability distribution of geolocation errors, typically, either multivariate Gaussian or Laplacian. Using this data, either a 90% probability error ellipsoid (or ellipse) can be computed, and scalar accuracy metrics (LE90, CE90, and SE90) can also be computed that contain less information than the ellipsoid but are convenient summaries.

Predicted accuracy is assessed using (approximately) iid samples of geolocation error normalized by their corresponding error covariance matrices. Results are quantified based on how reliably the error covariance and corresponding probability distribution represent actual geolocation errors. The assessment can also be used to determine if corresponding predicted accuracy requirements for the Geolocation System are met. Reliable predicted accuracy enables informed use of geolocations and/or corresponding products as well as optimal fusion with other geolocation products. This Webinar also presented recommended processing associated with geolocations and their accuracy and/or predicted accuracy, including: (1) specification, assessment, and validation of requirements, (2) computation of error ellipsoids and scalar accuracy metrics, (3) representation of geolocation errors as random vectors, stochastic processes, or random fields, (4) Estimators and their Quality Control, such as WLS batch solutions and Kalman Filter sequential solutions, and (5) Monte-Carlo simulation or errors. Corresponding details are also provided in publicly available and referenced NGA-authored Technical Guidance Documents.

Presenters
John Dolloff, a senior scientist at KBR, has been involved in various aspects of geopositioning for over 40 years supporting the NGA and related organizations as a Subject Matter Expect (SME) specializing in applying advanced linear algebra, estimation theory, probability, and statistics; particularly, as related to photogrammetric principles.

Hank Theiss, a senior scientist who works part-time at KBR, is a Research Associate Professor at the University of Arkansas in the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies (CAST) with over 25 years of experience supporting NGA and related organizations as a photogrammetry SME.

Brianna Bambic will be presenting “Allen Coral Atlas: A New Technology for Coral Reef Conservation” at the next GeoBytes webinar on Friday, September 23 at 12:00 pm ET. The webinar is FREE for all CaGIS members. See attached abstract for more information about the presentation.

Please see the CaGIS GeoBytes page for more information on registering.

Abstract

Coral reef managers and decision makers at multiple scales need information, in near real time, to react to the increasing threats facing reefs. However, more than three quarters of the world’s coral reefs have never been mapped and lack monitoring. To address this knowledge gap and to support, inform, and inspire critical actions to manage and protect coral reefs, the Allen Coral Atlas combines high resolution satellite imagery, machine learning, and field data to produce globally consistent benthic and geomorphic maps and monitoring systems of the world’s coral reefs. The initiative’s goal is to help stakeholders ranging from local communities to regional and national governments reach their conservation targets and improve their coastal resilience. The multi-disciplinary partnership is led by Arizona State University, in collaboration with Planet, University of Queensland, and the Coral Reef Alliance. Baseline maps have multiple uses, including: sustainable coastal development, site selection of marine protected areas, planning of restoration activities, and reef fisheries management. In this presentation, we will demonstrate how the Allen Coral Atlas supports data-driven management, conservation, and restoration of coral reefs at local, national, regional, and global scales. We have developed online courses to facilitate increased use and impact of the Atlas, and are collaborating with networks of individuals and institutions who can be alerted when changes are detected (e.g., large-scale bleaching or sedimentation events).

Brianna Bambic leads the Allen Coral Atlas Field Engagement team at the National Geographic Society and Arizona State University. With a coral reef biology and resource management background, she was an Independent Researcher for 7 years that culminated in a virtual reality experience of Half Moon Caye National Monument, Belize with a National Geographic Explorer Grant, helping communicate science to the public. Brianna received her MS in natural resource management from the University of Akureyri, Iceland in 2019. Her expertise includes coastal and marine management, global science communication, and developing capacity around remote sensing and mapping. With countless hours underwater and >700 logged dives, she loves spending time exploring the ocean.

The Cartography and Geographic Information Society (CaGIS) invites proposals for research or outreach projects that have the potential to transform global challenges into new opportunities that advance and promote Cartography and GIScience.

Creativity, novelty, and the potential for broader impacts to society will constitute key criteria for evaluating these proposals for funding.

Proposals may request a budget up to $10,000, and CaGIS expects to fund at least one project during this funding cycle. We welcome early-career individuals or teams to submit proposals, and at least one person on the project team must be a current CaGIS member (visit cartogis.org/membership to join CaGIS).

Please see the CaGIS Rising page for more information!

Rodney Jackson will be presenting “2022 Update of the USDoL Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM)” at the next GeoBytes webinar on Friday, June 3 at 12:00 pm ET. The webinar is FREE for all CaGIS members. See attached abstract for more information about the presentation.

Please see the CaGIS GeoBytes page for more information on registering.

Abstract

In collaboration with the US Department of Labor (USDoL), the National Geospatial Technology Center (GeoTech Center) is updating the Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM). The GTCM framework was developed through a collaborative effort involving the US DoL Employment and Training Administration (ETA), the GeoTech Center, and industry experts. We are seeking geospatial professionals to complete a review of the GTCM. Their commitment to participate in an assessment of the GTCM tiers via online survey will enable us to update the competency model to best reflect the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) needed in the geospatial industry.

Dr. Rodney D. Jackson serves as the Director for the Special Operations School of Information Technology (SOSIT). He has 20 years of experience in higher education, having held various teaching and administrative positions at community colleges, universities, and governmental institutions of higher learning. A geographer by training, Rodney is Certified Geographic Information Systems Professional (GISP). He prefers to fly-fish local freshwater streams during his free time. Rodney retired from the United States Army Reserves as Lieutenant Colonel in the Engineer Corps (Geospatial Designator) in 2017.

Bo Zhao will be presenting “Deep Fake geography? A humanistic GIS Reflection upon Geospatial Artificial Intelligence” at the next GeoBytes webinar on Friday, May 27 at 12:00 pm ET. The webinar is FREE for all CaGIS members. See attached abstract for more information about the presentation.

Please see the CaGIS GeoBytes page for more information on registering.

Abstract

The ongoing development of Geospatial Artificial Intelligence (GeoAI) has raised deep concerns about the emergence of deep fake geography and its potentials in transforming the human perception of the geographic world (Zhao et al 2021). This seminar presents a humanistic GIS reflection upon GeoAI (Zhao 2022) and its social implications using an empirical study that dissected the algorithmic mechanism of falsifying satellite images with non-existent landscape features. To demonstrate our pioneering attempt at deep fake detection, a robust approach is then proposed and evaluated. Our proactive study warns of the emergence and proliferation of deep fakes in geography just as “lies” in maps. We suggest timely detections of deep fakes in geospatial data and proper coping strategies when necessary. More importantly, it is encouraged to cultivate critical geospatial data literacy and thus to understand the multi-faceted impacts of deep fake geography on individuals and human society.

Bo Zhao is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Washington, Seattle. His recent research interests include GIScience, geographical misinformation, and social implications of emerging GIS technologies, especially in the context of the United States or China.

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